• The Black Liberation Theology of

    Disability Movement

    Frequently Asked Questions

    Q: Can you tell me about Kendrick Arthur Kemp’s story?

    A: A short bio of Kendrick’s story is available on this website. Click here to read his story.

    Q: What is the origin of Black Theology?

    A: The idea of “black theology” emerged when a small group of radical black clergy began to reinterpret the meaning of the Christian faith from the standpoint of the black struggle for liberation in the United States during the second half of the 1960s. To theologize from within the black experience rather than be confined to duplicating the theology of Europe or white North America was the main objective of the new black theology. It represented the theological reflections of a radical black clergy seeking to interpret the meaning of God’s liberating presence in a society where blacks were being economically exploited and politically marginalized because of their skin color.1

    Q: What is Black Liberation Theology of Disability?

    A: Black Liberation Theology of Disability a) encompasses black persons living with disabilities and focuses on their needs socially, spiritually, and economically b) seeks to transform society to embrace black persons living with disabilities as an integral part in the fabric of society c) understands a disabled God; a God paralyzed by the cross; a God, not apathetic to suffering, but in solidarity with the marginalized.

    Q: What was the genesis of Black Liberation Theology of Disability?

    A: Through the support of his advisors and mentors, the late Dr. James H. Cone and Dr. Cornel West, Kendrick Arthur Kemp studied Black Liberation Theology at Union Theological Seminary and was encouraged to discover his own Liberation Theology from his own unique voice.

     

    Through his experience – having a stroke at age 20 and 22, leaving him with physical disability – Kendrick shares his story of living a lonely, ostracized, and marginalized life because of his disability. Through wrestling with his faith, Kendrick was able to reimagine God, and that carried him through the challenges and onto a path that he continues to serve others, particularly black people, who are living with disabilities. As a Minister, a Theologian, a Thought Leader, a Social Activist, a Disability Consultant and Advocate for Equality, Kendrick has shared his life experiences as a black man living with disability in churches and working with different related organizations.

    Q: What types of Speaking Engagements is Kendrick available to speak at?

    A: Kendrick has participated in more than 30 engagements in over the past two years. He has presented as Guest Speaker, Guest Presenter, Guest Minister, Guest Preacher, Inspirational Speaker, Keynote Speaker, Guest Panelist, Contributor, and Facilitator. Click here to send an inquiry to schedule a speaking engagement with Kendrick Arthur Kemp.

    Q: How can I book a Speaking Engagement with Kendrick?

    A: Kendrick is available to discuss any and all opportunities to speak, collaborate, and contribute to the conversation as it relates to Black Liberation Theology and Black Liberation Theology of Disability. Click here to send an inquiry to schedule a speaking engagement with Kendrick Arthur Kemp.

    Click here to ask Kendrick a direct question.

     

    1. James H. Cone. For My People: Black Theology and the Black Church. Where have we been and where are we going? (New York: Orbis Books, 1984). 5.

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